The Bodhran

The bodhrán is the heartbeat of Irish music. This ancient framedrum is traditionally made with a wooden body and a goat-skin head, and is played with a double-headed stick called a cipín, tipper, or beater. The modern Irish word bodhrán is properly pronounced bow-rawn, like Cow brawn, with a slight emphasis on the first syllable. I have some more information on the word bodhrán, including discussion of the right word for a bodhrán-player.

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If you have comments, suggestions or information, please submit them here.

"When I Grow Up"
is a song about a goat who desires to become a bodhran when he passes on.
It appears that credit for authorship of the lyrics and/or song should go to Brian O'Rourke.
Please click here For a copy of the lyrics.

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Thanks to everyone who has contributed to these pages. Special thanks to Gerard Manning for giving me a new home; to Pat Murphy, Brent Santin, Bob Denton, and Lark in the Morning for material I've snitched to use here; to Kevin Rice for all the stuff he provided; and to David James for scanning some of the knotwork I've used.

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Return to the
Bodhrán home page.

Part of the Ceolas
celtic music archive

Josh Mittleman
bodhran@ceolas.org
Kirk Witmer
khwitmer@juno.com

 
Except for material noted as written by other authors, these pages and their contents are copyright 1995 - 2007 by Josh Mittleman. Nothing on these pages may be published, distributed, or copied for any purpose other than fair use or personal use, unless specific permission is given by the author.

Some of the knotwork used on these pages is in the public domain, and you are welcome to copy it. Please read the details first, copy only what is allowed, and don't use the knotwork bars in the same colors I've used.